There’s a paradox when it comes to radioactive material and its portrayal to non-specialists; the fact that radiation is easily detected. The quantification of how radioactive a material is, at first glance, appears quite scary, particularly because it’s so unfamiliar to us. What the heck is a Bequerel or a Sievert after all? After Fukushima, […]

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Nuclear power is emotive, some artists use this to produce some of the most pervasive and fascinating media. Daniel Cooper takes us through, and critiques, some of the media he’s been consuming lately. Occupied Occupied (or Okkupert) is a Norwegian TV series which aired recently in the UK on Sky Arts. In the near future, […]

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The Hitchhiker’s have be grappling with one of the hardest, and most important questions this month, ‘Education : how do we engage the public?’. Caroline McCalman, provides some perspective. Three years ago, a few months into my PhD, my colleagues and I in the Nuclear Societies research network at the University of Sheffield were invited to attend the annual […]

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Marika Hietala, Ph.D. researcher from The University of Sheffield, discusses and compares how the news of the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear disaster was distributed in West Cumbria (UK) and Satakunta (Finland).   Fukushima: Initial reception   When the nuclear disaster occurred in Fukushima in March 2011 I was busy with my undergrad dissertation and as a result, oblivious to […]

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The sheer amount of media coverage of the 2011 Fukushima Daiichi nuclear disaster has been nothing short of staggering. Huge initial television and newspaper coverage of the incident as it unfolded bloated into a swathe of online articles and blogs by both professional journalists and members of the public. The advent of social media meant […]

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